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? the signs aren't clear. mitch mcconnell seemed to be saying no on tuesday, john boehner seemed to be saying possibly. so the issue is are they willing to move to the center on key issues? >> the books are being written but the chapters have yet to be lived out in a second obama term. ron suskin wrote in an op-ed for "the new york times" about whether obama can give the confidence americans need right now, focusing on legacy, which he goes on to say is the end game of the president and is often missing what's happened before his eyes. the great mishap of the first term is failing to direct. with a new president, a sky high approval rating, a sea of enthusiasts. with hindsight 2020, how will obama be different with legacy now in front of his mind? >> i actually think, in terms of legacy, he's going to have the legacy of bringing health care reform, which presidents have tried for a very long time, to fruition here in america, and he made a choice in doing that, and it probably was a choice that cost him some political capital because it came at the expense of some other things he might have d
to stay put, mitch mcconnell staying put. harry reid and john boehner staying put. the president back in, what people would expect musical chairs. none will happen. it's the same people in the same positions and yesterday senate majority leader mitch mcconnell took to the floor and said they won't compromise. we had that interview with paul ryan with abc's jonathan karl saying it's not a mandate. they have a divided government so they'll continue with back and forth of head butting and the taxes should not be raised on wealthiest americans. are we headed just for the same old same old once again? >> i don't think so. first of all we are very pleased about nancy pelosi remaining as leader. she's done an extraordinary job in helping to increase our numbers here on the democratic side, in raising the money that was necessary for us to strengthen our hand here in the house and so she has done such a good job that we urged her to please stay on and that experience really does count. let me just say this, there is some posturing going on and i do think that this posturing is going to perhaps c
a run against mitch mcconnell. however, she told "us weekly." while i'm honored by the consideration, let's focus oncoming together to keep moving america's families and especially our kids forward. >>> so what happens to a presidential campaign after a loss? the staffers, the campaigners, the candidate? since mitt romney's defeat on tuesday his campaign twitter feed has fallen silent and the credit cards have stopped working pretty much right away. for a look into the end of the romney campaign we turn to garret headache, fresh off the campaign trail after following the former governor's campaign. >> 16 months? >> give or take. >> don't look worse for ware. >> tell us about what it was like wednesday morning, the i guess, you know, they knew going in they were going to have to throw in the towel, what was it like after midnight and how the campaign disbanded? >> sort of like a last person out turn off the lights. you saw staffers coming home after what they expected to be this huge party, getting out of cabs, having their credit cards turned off as you mentioned. people the next day
speaker boehner and senator mcconnell and others on the republican side is this whole disingenuous problem that you can solve the problem by closing loopholes. most of those don't touch the wealthiest americans. unless you're willing to deal with rates, capital gains, dividends and the highest marginal rate, you don't really touch the very wealthiest americans by dealing with home mortgage deductions, certainly the eitc or the child tax credit. those are where the biggest sources of tax expenditures are. i think it is going to be a tough sell. although, on the other hand, i do believe there are a lot of republicans who understand that this no taxes, the grover norquist pledge, issing this that is preventing real progress from being made. people like scott riggle from virginia who's pluckily renounced the pledge, i think there's a possibility we're going to see yield with a number of members. and if up to 70 republicans say we want a deal on this topic, they'll get plenty of help from our side. >> there's been talk about nancy pelosi and the speculation that she's going to step down as mino
themselves. frankly, i don't know if the republicans themselves, if john boehner and mitch mcconnell, know how much wiggle roop they have at this point. they're still serving their caucuses and trying to figure out where everybody is. that more than anything is going to determine what kind of deal gets made. the democrats are presenting a very united front. they seem very confident. people on the left are very encouraged by the strong statement that the president made on friday. >> you also wrote here in your most recent column that at least at this point it looks like we know which president obama is going to show up for these negotiations. it is not going to be the compromiser in chief. >> right, the sort of tremendously weak negotiator he proved to be on the debt ceiling a year ago is the one democrats were fearful was going to show up again. at least so far you had him pointing to his leverage on friday. that's encouraging for democrats. >> amy, what are the chances that the speaker is going to be able to get some of his folks to fall in line? >> well, it's going to be a very tough tas
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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